Live Progressive

What about being modern, innovative and groundbreaking every day of your life?

theimpeccablydressedmrbwooster:

themaninthegreenshirt:

Miles Davis could be impossible – sometimes hilariously so. In the early 60s he was booked to play the Village Vanguard in New York. He turned up an hour late and walked on stage to rapturous applause. After counting in a blues tune he played just one note of it before walking off – to a standing ovation. “Why are they clapping if he only played one note?” one audience member asked the management. “You don’t pay to see him play,” came the reply, “you pay to see him think.”


http://theimpeccablydressedmrbwooster.tumblr.com/

Anonymous asked: Do you think there is a difference between being well-dressed and having style?

wellwornwornwell:

Being well-dressed leaves people thinking about your clothes. Being stylish leaves people thinking about you.

kleidsam:

Ugh. 

Not satisfied with today´s colourwork. Additionally, i neither was able to capture their true shades….hence the “black and white” edition of today´s WIWT. 

archiemcphee:

These amazing photos were taken by Russian photographer Alexey Kljatov, who adapted his camera in order to achieve remarkably close-up focus on individual snowflakes after they’ve fall on the ground. He illuminates his shots with a flashlight and the background texture is dark wool fabric.

Alexy’s images reveal the unique geometric shapes of each snowflake with such astonishing clarity that it’s easy to forget just how tiny they really are. Visit Alexey Kljatov’s Flickr stream to view many more of his remarkable snowflake photos.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

(via swedishprep)

sowhatelseisnew:

Another picture of this outfit I wore the other day. I don’t think I’ve ever discussed the thought process behind any of my outfits. Most of the time though, there are some general rules that guide me when getting dressed. The level of formality that garments hold are important, it’s almost as important as colour combination and interplay between textures and fabrics. In fact, these three aspects very much depend on each other: Formality, colours & textures/material.
I won’t go to deep into this subject right now, but at least I can use this as a backdrop to explain the outfit pictured above:
1. I wear a cashmere sport coat. It’s semi-informal - as it’s brown, has a window pane check (yes, some formal suits have a window pane check, but they’re never brown) and has patch pockets.
2. I wear a pale blue Oxford cotton shirt. Pale blue is a great go-to colour for shirts, since it works with most outfits. Oxford is a quite informal fabric. This shirt does however, have a spread collar. Spread collars are generally quite formal. Therefore you could make the point that also the shirt is semi-informal (some people argue the point that spread collars on Oxford cloth shirts are bastardizations though, I don’t agree).
3. I wear a silk bow tie in a blue and green pattern. The blue works well with both the main brown colour of the sport coat and reflects the subtle blue lines within the window pane pattern. The kind of bottle green that makes up the pattern of the bow tie looks great with the chocolate brown of the sport coat, since they are both within the same spectrum of classically autumnal colours. Bow ties are classically deemed just as formal as ties, but due to their stance as somewhat eccentric and due to pattern/colour mix it works within this rather informal setting.
4. I wear a cream coloured silk pocket square. It’s a low-contrast mix with the sport coat, which is a good thing. Some people argue that white pocket squares goes with anything, but they do make a stark contrast to almost anything you might wear. White is classically seen as the most formal colour of pocket ornamentations, especially when the pocket square is made of linen. A cream coloured silk pocket square folded in Foo’s bend-it-over-fold will work with lots of different getups within the less formal spectrum of menswear.
5. I paired this with mid grey flannel pants, as formal as odd pants go, but still odd pants. Grey flannel is incredibly easy to match with most jacketing and is highly recommended to any man with a desire to have a versatile wardrobe staple.
6. As can be seen in the earlier post I went with quite unconventional footwear. This was mostly because I wanted to try out my new shoes. I changed to a pair of mid brown suede shoes with rubber soles before heading out, both because of the horrible slush outside, and because it was a better match with this particular outfit. In shoes, suede is less formal than calf skin and brown is less formal than black (quite simplified). A blue shoe is an odd bird that I wouldn’t recommend you to buy, until you’ve got your shoe wardrobe staples.

sowhatelseisnew:

Another picture of this outfit I wore the other day. I don’t think I’ve ever discussed the thought process behind any of my outfits. Most of the time though, there are some general rules that guide me when getting dressed. The level of formality that garments hold are important, it’s almost as important as colour combination and interplay between textures and fabrics. In fact, these three aspects very much depend on each other: Formality, colours & textures/material.

I won’t go to deep into this subject right now, but at least I can use this as a backdrop to explain the outfit pictured above:

1. I wear a cashmere sport coat. It’s semi-informal - as it’s brown, has a window pane check (yes, some formal suits have a window pane check, but they’re never brown) and has patch pockets.

2. I wear a pale blue Oxford cotton shirt. Pale blue is a great go-to colour for shirts, since it works with most outfits. Oxford is a quite informal fabric. This shirt does however, have a spread collar. Spread collars are generally quite formal. Therefore you could make the point that also the shirt is semi-informal (some people argue the point that spread collars on Oxford cloth shirts are bastardizations though, I don’t agree).

3. I wear a silk bow tie in a blue and green pattern. The blue works well with both the main brown colour of the sport coat and reflects the subtle blue lines within the window pane pattern. The kind of bottle green that makes up the pattern of the bow tie looks great with the chocolate brown of the sport coat, since they are both within the same spectrum of classically autumnal colours. Bow ties are classically deemed just as formal as ties, but due to their stance as somewhat eccentric and due to pattern/colour mix it works within this rather informal setting.

4. I wear a cream coloured silk pocket square. It’s a low-contrast mix with the sport coat, which is a good thing. Some people argue that white pocket squares goes with anything, but they do make a stark contrast to almost anything you might wear. White is classically seen as the most formal colour of pocket ornamentations, especially when the pocket square is made of linen. A cream coloured silk pocket square folded in Foo’s bend-it-over-fold will work with lots of different getups within the less formal spectrum of menswear.

5. I paired this with mid grey flannel pants, as formal as odd pants go, but still odd pants. Grey flannel is incredibly easy to match with most jacketing and is highly recommended to any man with a desire to have a versatile wardrobe staple.

6. As can be seen in the earlier post I went with quite unconventional footwear. This was mostly because I wanted to try out my new shoes. I changed to a pair of mid brown suede shoes with rubber soles before heading out, both because of the horrible slush outside, and because it was a better match with this particular outfit. In shoes, suede is less formal than calf skin and brown is less formal than black (quite simplified). A blue shoe is an odd bird that I wouldn’t recommend you to buy, until you’ve got your shoe wardrobe staples.